blog by bethel


taking business to the next level


Making Standard Business Processes Personal and Personal Processes Standard

Making Standard Business Processes Personal and Personal Processes Standard

We are in the very personal business of weddings.  So, yes, we do what we do because we love it, or at least love it most days.  Yet, we still are running businesses, and therefore, we need to implement a set of processes that are standard for each couple we work with.  Why, you might ask, can’t we work with each and every couple in a different way?  The simple answer is that, even if we have only a handful of couples each year, developing a standard set of processes allows us to:
1) relate to each couple how we will work together;
2) deliver on what we told the couple, thus meeting or exceeding their expectations; and
3) control time and costs per couple, allowing us to know that the price we charge is going to make us the profit we expect.

So, how do we make our standard processes personal?   The main way is to use automated communication only when necessary, or when there is absolutely no need for personalization (eg. automated invoice reminders).  For each business and business model, the amount of automation will vary, for sure.  Instead, use a standard or edited workflow to remind you of when you need to send a specific email or any other type of standard communication, keeping you on schedule without it being automated.  And, for those emails or other communications, use a templated or already-prepared script to not only get you started, but also to save time, while still having the ability to add in something personal and specific to that couple.  For example, I always send my thank you email the day after the wedding, and although I have an already prepared template email, since so much of what I’m going to tell that couple is the same or close to the same for every couple, I always add in a few personal touches or make appropriate edits.  For instance, a mention of something special during their ceremony, a piece of follow-up information specific to that couple, something about their specific honeymoon destination, etc.   Another good tip is that when you create your process and its standard timeframes, build extra time into each step to make sure you accommodate a couple being late on a specific stage/step, while not making your job harder.  It won’t solve all issues, but it will mitigate most.

The same thinking applies to making the personal processes standard.   Do you want to know more about their relationship or family situation or the logistics around their wedding, like who is in the process or what music they want played?  Use a questionnaire which allows them to answer in a personal way and on their own convenient time, yet you make sure the questionnaire is sent out based on specific timing within your workflow.  Do you need to always have a final pre-wedding phone call with the couple because each wedding is so different, that – what you discuss, and the feedback you need – can’t be managed via e-mail?  Then make sure your workflow has you schedule the call well in advance, have a reminder e-mail go out a few days before the call, and have a basic script that you go from so that you make sure that you don’t miss anything.   And don’t forget that by reading reviews from your couples, and asking for feedback from other vendors, you can determine where within your process personalization is more, or less, important.

The idea is to have very defined business processes, while still allowing for the personal touch to be added to as many pieces as needed or wanted.   Obviously, if you work with 200 couples per year, you will likely have fewer steps within the process that are personal vs. if you work with 25 couples per year, but the thinking when developing or revising your processes should be the same, to meet or exceed the expectations of your couples in all parts of your process.


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